Benefits of Eradication


The globally threatened Bristle-Thighed Curlew winters on Pacific islands. (Photo: Ray Pierce)
The globally threatened Bristle-Thighed Curlew winters
on Pacific islands. (Photo: Ray Pierce).

Islands are global biodiversity hotspots. While accounting for less than 3% of the Earth's land area, they are home to 20% of all bird, reptile and plant species. Moreover, a high proportion of species on islands are endemic i.e. not found anywhere else in the world. This makes Pacific islands key to preserving global biodiversity.

In addition to their unique terrestrial biodiversity, Pacific islands also support large colonies of nesting seabirds and migratory shorebirds of which many are threatened or near-threatened. Seabirds are a key link between the marine and terrestrial environments. They transfer large amounts of nutrients from sea to land, resulting in nutrient-rich soils that support a variety of plant species. Seabirds and their eggs are important traditional food resources for island communities.

A Traditional Vanuatuan house built with local materials and showing the family taro plantation. (Photo: Marita Manly).
A Traditional Vanuatuan house built with local materials and showing
the family taro plantation. (Photo: Marita Manly).

In the Pacific islands, people remain heavily reliant on their unique biodiversity and ecosystems for their livelihoods and wellbeing. Loss of biodiversity has a direct impact on people's lives.

Most Pacific islands remain dependent on local natural resources for food and a source of income.